Rodrigo Moya

From lost to the river

From lost to the river

C#/Cocoa – Animate a split view’s collapsing/expanding

Wed, 25 Jun 2014 11:19:24 +0000

When I started working at Xamarin, I had the intention to blog about new technologies I was learning, but it’s been already 6 months and it didn’t happen at all, so better to start late than never. I’ll start then with a nice piece of code I came up with, and which is this:

public static class CocoaExtensions
{
	public static void AnimatedSetPositionOfDivider (this NSSplitView splitView, float position, int divider)
	{
		var view0 = splitView.Subviews [0];
		var view1 = splitView.Subviews [1];

		var newFrame0 = view0.Frame;
		var newFrame1 = view1.Frame;
		if (splitView.IsVertical) {
			newFrame0.Width = position == 0 ? 0 : position - splitView.DividerThickness;
			newFrame1.Width = position == splitView.MaxPositionOfDivider (divider)
				? 0
				: splitView.Bounds.Width - position - splitView.DividerThickness;
		} else {
			newFrame0.Height = position == 0 ? 0 : position - splitView.DividerThickness;
			newFrame1.Height = position == splitView.MaxPositionOfDivider (divider)
				? 0
				: splitView.Bounds.Height - position - splitView.DividerThickness;
		}

		newFrame0.Width = newFrame0.Width < 0 ? 0 : newFrame0.Width;
		newFrame0.Height = newFrame0.Height < 0 ? 0 : newFrame0.Height;
		newFrame1.Width = newFrame1.Width < 0 ? 0 : newFrame1.Width;
		newFrame1.Height = newFrame1.Height < 0 ? 0 : newFrame1.Height;

		view0.Hidden = view1.Hidden = false;
		view0.AutoresizesSubviews = view1.AutoresizesSubviews = true;

		if ((newFrame0.Width == 0 && newFrame0.Height == 0) ||
		    (newFrame1.Width == 0 && newFrame1.Height == 0)) {
			return;
		}

		var singleAnimation0 = new NSMutableDictionary ();
		singleAnimation0 [NSViewAnimation.TargetKey] = view0;
		singleAnimation0 [NSViewAnimation.EndFrameKey] = NSValue.FromRectangleF (newFrame0);

		var singleAnimation1 = new NSMutableDictionary ();
		singleAnimation1 [NSViewAnimation.TargetKey] = view1;
		singleAnimation1 [NSViewAnimation.EndFrameKey] = NSValue.FromRectangleF (newFrame1);

		var animation = new NSViewAnimation (new NSDictionary[] { singleAnimation0, singleAnimation1 });
		animation.Duration = 0.25f;
		animation.StartAnimation ();
	}
}

The main reason to share this code is because I couldn’t find anything that worked to do that (animate the collapsing and expanding of a NSSplitView, which is, yes, you got it right, a split view, like GTK’s GtkPaned), so I hope it is useful for someone. But it also shows a few interesting things about both C# and Cocoa:

  • The most obvious one: writing Cocoa apps in C# is much better than using Objective C (although, to be honest, I also like Objective C).
  • Cocoa (and CoreAnimation) lets you easily add animations to your UI, by having the animations layer tightly integrated into the API. Of course, animations are not always great, but in some cases, like this one where the collapsing/expansion of the split view’s subviews is animated, it makes such a huge difference to the UI that it’s very nice to be able to do it that easily.
  • C# allows extending existing classes, by writing extension methods (static methods in static classes that have a “this” modifier in the 1st argument, which specifies the class the method extends). This is a great way to extend existing classes, without having to do any subclassing. Once you have the extension method, you can just call it on any NSSplitView:
    mySplitView.AnimatedSetPositionOfDivider (position, divider);
    

    You can extend any class, and this what a lot of technologies (LINQ, Reactive Extensions, etc) in the .NET world use.

I started also, when I started working at Xamarin, getting some of the nice ideas from Cocoa and C# into GLib/GTK, so will publish that as soon as I get something useful from it. Hopefully it won’t be another 6 months :-D

And yes, Xamarin is hiring. If interested, drop me a mail, or just apply directly, as you wish.

Xamarin

Fri, 10 Jan 2014 15:07:58 +0000

After some well deserved relaxing time, I am glad to announce that, since last Tuesday, I am a happy member of the Xamarin crew, where I’ll be working on the awesome cross-platform development tools the company makes.

This is indeed a change from what I have been doing in the last years, as I will be focusing on platforms other than Linux, as has been the case for the last 15 years, but to be honest, and after thinking a lot about it during my “well deserved relaxing time”, this is something that I really needed to boost my career. Not working on other platforms, but moving out of my comfort zone and find something new and exciting to work on. And Xamarin really seems to be the perfect place for this: the company is full of ex-Ximianites (Ximian is, till now, the best company I have ever worked for), lead by great people and focused on making great development tools/APIs, which is something that I have always liked but haven’t had the chance to work on as much as I would have wanted.

Of course, this doesn’t mean I will stop caring/using/developing GNOME. On the contrary, I think, and based on what I have been working on during my vacation, this will help me in making a better contribution to the project, as a lot of things I have been/will be learning, I think, are great for making GNOME better. But will talk about all that in separate blog posts, as things progress.

Many thanks to my girlfriend Yolanda and my friend Ismael Olea, who were the ones to pinpoint what I needed, which was to look for some exciting new stuff, rather than only wanting to stay on my comfort zone, and to Miguel, for the great coding challenge he got me to do, which made me learn exciting stuff and convince me finally that Xamarin was the best place for me.

Farewell Collabora

Fri, 08 Nov 2013 16:04:03 +0000

Today has been my last day at Collabora, where I’ve spent the last 2 years having a great time and working on some very cool and some not that cool projects, but always with great people as teammates. On the cool projects front, AF_BUS wins. Even though it didn’t gain upstream acceptance, at least it opened the race to bring D-Bus into the kernel, which I think is a great thing (based on real numbers :-D ).

A big hug to all collaborans I’ve met in these 2 years!

Not sure yet what’s coming up next, but first thing I will do, for the first time in aeons, is to get a few weeks of well deserved relax, work on some personal stuff I haven’t had much time to work on lately, and have fun!

Videoblog Ep #2: De Yesa a Ayerbe

Wed, 19 Jun 2013 18:10:00 +0000

Ruta de este pasado domingo, de Yesa, en Navarra, hasta Ayerbe, en Huesca, con visita especial a los Mallos de Riglos


desktop-webapp-browser-extension

Thu, 13 Jun 2013 10:42:12 +0000

A few months ago I started work on a Google Chrome/ium extension for integrating Chrome apps into GNOME Shell. The idea is that, whenever you install a Chrome app, a .desktop file is created in ~/.local/share/applications, for them to show up as normal applications.

Also, for desktop shortcuts for “normal” web pages, since Chrome/ium uses the favicon from the pages, the icons look really ugly on GNOME Shell’s overview. So, this extension also tries to retrieve a higher resolution icon and uses it if found, and if not, retrieves a snapshot from the page and uses that as the icon, making it look much nicer in the overview.

So, nothing really magic, but discussing it with some team mates, I thought it could be helpful for other people, so hence this public announcement :-)

The code can be found here.

Next step, when I have time and find out how, is to submit this to the Google Chrome store, but for now, you can just build it and install the .crx file into your Chrome/ium.

Videoblog Ep #1: ¿De qué va este videoblog?

Thu, 13 Jun 2013 10:22:00 +0000

Tras varios intentos frustrados de grabarme la voz mientras conducía, por fin he podido encontrar la manera de hacerlo. Así que, primer episodio de verdad del videoblog: